Dolphin Watching Boat Trips

Dolphin Watching Boat Trips

Dolphin Watching Boat Trips

Cardigan Bay Wildlife Tours

Information

Name: Dolphin Watching Boat Trips

Location: New Quay 19 miles 30 Minutes drive

Description

Cardigan Bay is home to Britain’s biggest resident population of dolphins – you can see bottle-nosed dolphins all year round and New Quay is the hottest spot. Harbour porpoises are also frequently spotted and if you’re really lucky the odd Orca or humpback may swim by!

New Quay is definitely Dolphin Central – you are almost guaranteed to see a dolphin even from the harbour wall. To increase your chances, take one of the daily charter boats out into the bay. SeaMor operate 90 minute guided Dolphin Watching Boat Trips from 1st April to 31st October. The boats are for a maximum of 12 people and the 2020 price is £17 for adults.

See some great videos on their Facebook Page

They also offer a Sunset trip where there is an even higher sighting rate as the fish the dolphins feed on are more active closer to the surface. The price is the same as the daytime tours.

For a really special day out, you can arrange a half or full day private hire with a marine biologist and qualified skipper to ferry you along the coast. You can take part in dolphin surveys and listen to them with the underwater hydrophone. Swim and snorkel or visit Cardigan Island to see the grey seals. Visit the gorgeous beaches at Llangrannog and Tresaith or stop for lunch in Aberaeron. You can choose your own itinerary. Half day trip is £240 and full day is £440

Get in touch with SeaMor on 07795 242445 or info@seamor.org

 

Penbryn Beach

Penbryn Beach

The Locals' Secret

Information

Name:Penbryn Beach

Location: Cardigan Bay -23miles 40 mins drive

Description

Penbryn is owned by the National Trust and is almost a mile in length. The spacious, golden sands are backed by a dune system and cliffs with caves accessible at low tide. The beach is managed by the National Trust and is in a rural and unspoilt location with the option of a beautiful walk through a fern-clad valley from the car park.

The National Trust car park has toilets and the Plwmp Tart Cafe and you then walk downhill to get to the beach (there is a small charge for car parking). It is around 1/4 of a mile down the road or take the beautiful woodland walk from behind the cafe. This is longer at 1/2 a mile and is steep in places but is totally enchanting! The shady path suddenly opens up to the wide expanse of the beach and the sound of the waves, a lovely approach.

There is a turning circle and dropping off point at the beach edge for disabled visitors or those who don’t want to walk down, but this area must be kept clear for any emergency vehicles – cars must be parked in the car park.

The beach is great for walking and there is a cave to explore at the right hand side of the beach if you visit at low tide. At very low tide there is another beach further around the headland, but beware as there is no other way to get off this cove so if the tide turns you could be stranded!

The Wales Coast Path leads from the beach in both directions and offers gorgeous views across the bay. The remote location and lack of light pollution make this an ideal spot for stargazing in the summer months – Penbryn Beach is a designated Dark Skies Discovery site and dusk is a great time to see seals and barn owls in the area.

Penbryn’s Claim to Fame is that it was used for a scene in the James Bond “Die Another Day: movie! You can see why in the clip below – it looks stunning.